Can Garlic Knots be found anywhere in Italy?

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One must ask, are Garlic Knots truly Italian? I sure have never seen them on the menu when vacationing in Rome or another European country. The word is, these tasty dough knots were invented at a Pizzeria in Queens in 1973. It was their way to reuse scraps from leftover pizza dough.

Garlic knots is a type of Garlic bread that was primarily found in New York and surrounding areas, but now has made it into the menus all over the US. I ate my first Garlic Knot in Johnson City, NY about 18 years ago and fell hard for the garlicky and chewy bread. I prepare the Garlic Knots from my no-knead bread recipe, the crusty Baguette dough to keep it easy, and it taste wonderful, almost like from a NY Pizzeria.

Recipe: My Crusty Baguette no-Knead Bread Dough

What every home baker should have. I use the Danish Dough whisk it to stir my no-knead dough:

Suggestion: If you want to serve the Garlic Knots later, or just want to freeze them, remove the Knots after 20 minutes of baking. Later before serving, spread the garlic mixture on top the defrosted Garlic Knots, bake for 5 to 10 min. at 400 F. or until until golden brown.

  • bread dough in bowl
  • dough, batter
  • spread bread dough
  • dough for Garlic knots
  • flattened dough with garlic sauce
  • Garlic knots dough
  • Dough covered to rise
  • Garlic knots
  • Garlic knots half baked
  • Baked Garlic knots
  • Garlic Knots, Marinara sauce
  • Serve Garlic knots with Marinara sauce
  • Garlic Knots in plastic container
Improves the “Krume”. The secret ingredient is Diastatic malt powder. Savvy bread bakers use it to promote a strong rise, great texture, and lovely brown crust. Just 1 tsp for 3 cups flour, and you would see and taste the difference.