Marburg Market Square, Marktplatz Sticky post

Marburg, a lovely old town with cobblestone streets and half-timbered homes

A large part of Marburg has many half-timbered homes that have been lovingly renovated and is today again showing its historical charm. My stroll through the picturesque alleys started at the Market square, whose striking Rathaus or town hall in late Gothic style was completed in 1527. I took a pause and shot some pictures of this magnificent building while waiting for the City Trolley Train. Continue reading Marburg, a lovely old town with cobblestone streets and half-timbered homes

Ulm Crooked House“ (Schiefes Haus) Sticky post

A Crooked or “Schiefes Haus” in Ulm

Last September I stopped at an Italian Eiscafé at the Fishermen’s Quarter in Ulm. I was sitting there enjoying my Cherry Amaretto Ice Cream cup (scroll down for recipe) with an excellent view to the „Crooked House“ or in German “Schiefes Haus”. Besides this precarious building, I visited the Ulm Cathedral that has the highest church tower in the world! The original half-timbered house from … Continue reading A Crooked or “Schiefes Haus” in Ulm

Halsbandsittich or Rose-Ringed Parakeet 

A strange sight, Parakeets make their home in German trees!

An unusual sight indeed, and that in Germany! The mild climate makes it possible that you will see little Parrots/Parakeets sitting on trees in Northern Rhineland. On the Königsallee in Düsseldorf, for example, the “Halsbandsittich” or Rose-Ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri) has now become a part of everyday life. The bright green birds can be seen at feeding stations, parks and balconies and sleep on trees in … Continue reading A strange sight, Parakeets make their home in German trees!

Haushaltsschule 1900's Sticky post

“Haushaltsschule” or Home Economics in 1900’s Germany

  In the so-called “Haushaltsschulen”, young, middle-class women were taught household skills, such as cooking, baking, sewing, handicrafts, gardening and cleaning to prepare them to be good housewives and wives. In connection with the women’s movement, around 1900, the first textbooks for home economics were also developed. Initially, however, household training was not viewed as a profession, but rather as a preparation for marriage. But … Continue reading “Haushaltsschule” or Home Economics in 1900’s Germany

Osterbrunnen, decorated Easter fountain

“Osterbrunnen”, the decorated Easter Fountains in Franconia

Decorating an “Osterbrunnen” is a German tradition of sprucing up public fountains with garlands and painted eggs for Easter. It began in the early 20th century in the Upper Franconia (Fränkische Schweiz) but also has spread to other regions. The decoration is usually kept from Good Friday until two weeks after Easter The tradition of decorating an Easter fountain is still relatively young. A little … Continue reading “Osterbrunnen”, the decorated Easter Fountains in Franconia

Bauernkalender, German Almanac 1847

A German Farmers Almanac or Bauernkalender

In a Bauernkalender weather rules, farmer’s rules, farmer’s wisdom, annual rules, daily rules, wisdom rules, animal rules, plant rules, harvesting rules, lost days, name days includes a farmer’s calendar! Experience and knowledge are handed down in the old peasant rules that are part of our cultural history! Generations of farmers and gardeners have gathered an immense amount of knowledge through expert observation of nature, which … Continue reading A German Farmers Almanac or Bauernkalender

Hofbräuhaus 1908 New York Sticky post

A Hofbräuhaus opened in 1908, but not in Munich

August L. Janssen, the future “Wirt” and proprietor of the Hofbräuhaus in New York City was born in Emden, Germany. At age 20 and after attending the University of Göttingen in the year of 1887, young Janssen, as so many other Germans at that time, took a ship to NY city in the hope to immigrate to America After Janssen arrived in the US he … Continue reading A Hofbräuhaus opened in 1908, but not in Munich

Forest Kindergarten, Waldkindergarten Sticky post

A Kindergarten in the Forest

The idea of ​​the first Forest Kindergarten or Daycare in the woods comes from Scandinavia. In the mid-1950’s, a Danish woman name Ella Flatau founded the first outdoor Kindergarten. From there it spread quickly in the 1990s. There are now around 2,000 “Waldkindergarten” of this sort in Germany. These are mostly state-approved daycares, and only trained educators work here. The groups have names such as Forest Spirits, Tree Frogs or Ladybugs. Continue reading A Kindergarten in the Forest