Spaghetti Carbonara has a long history

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According to a widespread legend, this dish goes back to the Italian Carbonari, who made charcoal in the Appenine mountains. It is said this Spaghetti dish was cooked over a fire in a cast iron pan during their breaks.

The Carbonari (Italian for “charcoal makers”) were an informal network of secret revolutionary societies active in the Italian mountains from about 1800 to 1831.

Spaghetti Carbonara

A legend emerged later, it is said the this Italian pasta classic was created in the 1920s. American soldiers stationed in Rome are said to have asked Italian friends to cook for them. They brought eggs and bacon, the Italians had their pasta. How exactly the carbonara emerged from this has not yet been clarified. I don’t care! The main thing: an Italian pasta hit was born. And holds up to this day!

Spaghetti Carbonara tastes like it sounds. Velvety, silky, incredibly creamy. The perfect harmony, fusion of sauce and pasta. And yet there is no other pasta classic where opinions differ more. Especially when it comes to ingredients. Let’s start with whole cream. Does it belong in the sauce? Definitely not. Neither does cream cheese, which you can frequently see in online recipes. Only Parmesan (or Romano) and Guanciale, Pancetta (thick bacon) are mandatory at Carbonara.

The most important ingredient in this tasty dish is a certain bacon. The Guanciale is made from the pork cheek. It is air-dried, non-smoked and is produced in Lazio, a region in central Italy. Its taste is unique! This piece of bacon is pretty hard to come by. You should ask an Italian deli in your city. It is definitely worth it! Alternatively, you can buy the pancetta, which is much easier to get. I like smoked, so I used thick smoked bacon for this recipe.